Screen Properties

This category is used for setting up various aspects of the screen. This includes setting the fonts, colors, and enabling or disabling certain GUI parts of the screen (either scrollbars, menu bar, etc.), and what parts of the status line are to be displayed.

Color configuration

The color selector dialog box is used to interactively set the colors of the various window areas in the main CRiSP editing window. It allows you to set the colors not only of the main areas but also of the colorizer token types. CRiSP can display different file types according to a set of individual language rules. For example, C/C++ files can have the foreground and background colors of comments in a different color to the normal text in a window.

Content window

This dialog box lets you configure the tabs in the Contents Window. You can reorder the settings and/or hide individual tabs which are of no interest to you.

Cursor

This dialog box allows you to configure what the edit mode cursor looks like. Changing the edit cursor can be useful on certain screens so that the cursor stands out more against the text and color scheme you choose.

Fonts

This dialog box allows you to change the font used in the editing window and/or used in the various dialog boxes.
There are three types of fonts which can be set:
Editing Area:        Used for the edit window. This is a normally a fixed width font.
Dialog boxes:       Used for dialog box buttons, menus and prompt fields.
Tables & trees:    Used for displaying information in a dialog box. Using a smaller font can allow you to see more entries in the dialog, e.g. files or functions.

Gui

This section allows you to configure the visibility of various GUI components.

Window properties

This dialog box is used to configure various aspects of the look and feel of the screen, including color and font settings. The dialog box is presented as a tabbed dialog box allowing you quick access to the different setup components.

Testimonials

"I have been developing using CRiSP for almost a year now, and have found it quite a time-saver and productivity tool. Granted it's more expensive than vi, or GNU emacs, but it also makes them look like the sick Stegosaurus (or was it a Bronto-saurus?) in Jurassic Park."

Crisp Screenshots

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